Book Reviews of Trains: A Memoir of a Hidden Childhood During and After World War 2

Trains: A Memoir of a Hidden Childhood During and After World War 2
Trains A Memoir of a Hidden Childhood During and After World War 2
Author: Miriam Winter
ISBN-13: 9780966016208
ISBN-10: 0966016203
Publication Date: 10/1997
Pages: 217
Rating:
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 4

4 stars, based on 4 ratings
Publisher: Kelton Pr
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

3 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Trains: A Memoir of a Hidden Childhood During and After World War 2 on + 87 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
This is the true story of Miriam Winter who was born in Poland and at the age of 6 in 1941 was sent away from her home. She never saw her parents, Grandparents or younger brother after that. The next twelve years she survived WW 2 by moving from city to city and living with various people in various circumstances, this is her story of survival. She changed her name twice to hide the fact that she was a jew. This is a very touching and interesting story, if you enjoy reading stories of survival you will like this one. It does not contain alot of graphic war content just her life experiences as a child and young adult.
reviewed Trains: A Memoir of a Hidden Childhood During and After World War 2 on + 68 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Miriam Winter escaped being sent to a concentration camp by hiding with different families in the Polish countryside. Unlike Anne Frank, who hid silently in an attic, Miriam hid in plain site, taking care of cows and attending Catholic church services alongside her host families.

This book does not speak much of the larger picture of WWII or Jewish oppression, but instead of the author's personal experiences. Much of the book focuses on her life after Poland was liberated, but before she felt free to reveal her true heritage.
reviewed Trains: A Memoir of a Hidden Childhood During and After World War 2 on + 149 more book reviews
One of the better "Holocaust survivor" memoirs I have read. The writing was good, the story flowed. I think the book provided the reader with a nice balance of the good and the ugly that the author experienced.

One of the better parts of the writing was that the book did not end when the war ended....the reader is provided with the "rest of the author's story".