Book Reviews of True Blue: The Dramatic History of the Los Angeles Dodgers, Told by the Men Who Lived It

True Blue: The Dramatic History of the Los Angeles Dodgers, Told by the Men Who Lived It
True Blue The Dramatic History of the Los Angeles Dodgers Told by the Men Who Lived It
Author: Steve Delsohn
ISBN-13: 9780380977550
ISBN-10: 0380977559
Publication Date: 3/2001
Pages: 304
Rating:
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 1

4 stars, based on 1 rating
Publisher: William Morrow Company
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed True Blue: The Dramatic History of the Los Angeles Dodgers, Told by the Men Who Lived It on + 7 more book reviews
Much of the information you get from baseball history books, no matter how good, is a glossing over of details in favor of the big picture. Not that there is anything wrong with that, but sometimes to get to the heart of what makes up a team, you have to go inside. That is what this book does.

Starting with the move of the Dodgers from Brooklyn to Los Angeles, you get a fresh perspective on the circumstances surrounding the relocation of the team. You get some contrasting views to the usual "ripped out the heart of Brooklyn" stories that usually go with the story of the team's move.

After that intro, there is a virtual season by season narrative by the players, coaches, managers, fans, ushers, peanut vendors, and more that were involved with or around the Dodgers. Some highlights include:

-Walter Alston challenging the team to a fist fight after they were whining during a losing streak.

-Leo Durocher's undermining of Alston during the 1962 campaign.

-Possible alternate reasons for Sandy Koufax's retirement.

-Tommy Lasorda's rise in the organization.

-The famous Steve Garvey/Don Sutton brawl.

-The clash between Pedro Guerrero and Kirk Gibson.

-O'Malley selling the team.

-Fox trading Mike Piazza.

-The Tommy Lasorda/Bill Russell feud.

And more...

The book covers the 1958-2000 seasons and does so admirably. There are some glaring personalities missing, however. Vin Scully is the major person missing from this interview pool. Sandy Koufax is the other, although with his history of declining to talk about his Dodger career, this is understandable.

Also, as pain-staking as some of the details for most seasons are documented, the ones that are glossed over seem very rushed. Nothing of note happened during those seasons? In addition, I would have liked a little more descriptions and reactions of important games and other milestones.

But despite my minor complaints, this is truly a great book for not only Dodger fans, but baseball fans alike.