Book Reviews of Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1)

Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1)
Uglies - Uglies, Bk 1
Author: Scott Westerfeld
ISBN-13: 9780439806114
ISBN-10: 0439806119
Publication Date: 2005
Pages: 425
Rating:
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 179

4.1 stars, based on 179 ratings
Publisher: Scholastic Inc.
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

72 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on
Helpful Score: 33
I was blown away by this book, and will be recommending it to all readers I know with anything in common with my tastes. Part of its impact on me is due to the low/moderate expectations I set out with. I'll also be singing its praises to younger readers, especially my nieces and other young girls (not excluding boys - but the body image themes are often more relevant to young women. Research shows that this is changing dramatically to include men, however).
I'm an adult reader who likes a bit of a challenge, so I must admit to needing to adjust my expectations a little bit - but that became very comfortable in a short time. A book to really settle into and live in for a while. The advanced and mature themes are as sublime as any I've encountered in other reading - and it would be a real boost for the culture if this book continued to gain popularity.
Light sci-fi, beautifully written characters. 5 stars from me.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on
Helpful Score: 14
It is actually HARD for me to give a review for this book, for I lack the words. Yet I feel that I MUST describe how unbelievably INCREDIBLE this book, author and series is, so that others may enjoy it. So, I simply say a few words: THIS IS ONE OF THE BEST SERIES I HAVE EVER READ! The other best series include Harry Potter (J.K.Rowling), Twighlight (Stephenie Meyer), and Witch (Nancy Holder, Debbie Vigue....I suggest that you read those too!
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 412 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 14
First of a teen fantasy trilogy sent in a future world where everyone is given an operation and turned pretty at the age of sixteen. Since we humans apparently hadn't learned our lesson and our civilization as we know it crumbled because of wars started based on differences between us, the powers that be have decided that everyone should be alike. The operation, based on years of scientific research, gives everyone a perfect, symmetrical face, shiny white teeth, sparkling eyes and a toned, trim body. Gone are the little (and big!) imperfections and variations that make us unique.

Of course, there are always going to be rebels out there, and Tally Youngblood meets one of them, a girl named Shay who shares her birthday. As they get to become friends, Tally, who is very much looking forward to turning from an Ugly (read: normal) into a Pretty, soon realizes that Shay isn't so excited about the operation. When she runs away a week before their birthday, Tally is worried about her--but not worried enough to jeopardize her own operation. Excellent start to a series that I'm very much looking forward to continuing; fiction with a bit of a conscience that gives all of us--teens and adults--something to think about.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on
Helpful Score: 9
This book is excellent! It is the first in the Uglies trilogy (Pretties, Specials) by Scott Westerfeld. They are soon to be made into movies!

These books aren't what I would call fantasy, they are more logical and futuristic and thought-provoking. Though if you like fantasy, you will like this too.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 37 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 8
Though this book is written for a teenage audience, a friend of mine convinced me to give it a try. It is slow to start, but it picks up quickly and is a fast read. I like the storyline and message about beauty and appearance. I think that this is a must read for teenagers. I will read "Pretties" to find out what happens next.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 31 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 7
This is one of those books that is meant for teenagers, but manages to be interesting enough that I still enjoyed it. It is a bit simple and quick-reading, so if you're really picky about your sci-fi, you might want to skip it. However, the premise and pieces of the background story as to what has happened to civilization, people, and how things ended up this way is interesting. The teaching-young-people motives are obvious, but there's a good bit more here than a simple moral hammer.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 188 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 5
I picked this book up based on a comment in a thread. The premise of the plot sounded so interesting with great potential. It's definitely a teen novel, though! Not my type of book so I won't be reading the others in the series. I wish it had been an adult book with more depth - it could have been a winner.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 83 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
Playing on every teens passionate desire to look as good as everybody else, Scott Westerfeld (Midnighters) projects a future world in which a compulsory operation at sixteen wipes out physical differences and makes everyone pretty by conforming to an ideal standard of beauty. The "New Pretties" are then free to play and party, while the younger "Uglies" look on enviously and spend the time before their own transformations in plotting mischievous tricks against their elders. Tally Youngblood is one of the most daring of the Uglies, and her imaginative tricks have gotten her in trouble with the menacing department of Special Circumstances. She has yearned to be pretty, but since her best friend Shay ran away to the rumored rebel settlement of recalcitrant Uglies called The Smoke, Tally has been troubled. The authorities give her an impossible choice: either she follows Shays cryptic directions to The Smoke with the purpose of betraying the rebels, or she will never be allowed to become pretty. Hoping to rescue Shay, Tally sets off on the dangerous journey as a spy. But after finally reaching The Smoke she has a change of heart when her new lover David reveals to her the sinister secret behind becoming pretty. The fast-moving story is enlivened by many action sequences in the style of videogames, using intriguing inventions like hoverboards that use the riders skateboard skills to skim through the air, and bungee jackets that make wild downward plunges survivable -- and fun. Behind all the commotion is the disturbing vision of our own society -- the Rusties -- visible only in rusting ruins after a virus destroyed all petroleum.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 330 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
Book 1 of the Trilogy. This book takes about 100 pages to get going, but once it does, it's quite good. Tally, an "Ugly", can't wait until her 16th birthday when she will become a "Pretty". That's how it is done now to stop all the name calling and bullying. All children at 16 have a surgery to become beautiful, they all look the same, party together, think the same, and have no cares in the world. That is until she meets Shay an "ugly" that tells her about a place called the Smoke where you can live without having to have the surgery. Where people like you for who you are and how you think. Tally will have to make a decision that may take her way from what she has always wanted.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 9 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
I would recomend this book to anyone who liked the Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins. All I can say about this book is WOW! This is such a great book! The only problem I have about it is that I am sad about the ending. Can't wait to read the rest of this spectacular series! You should get this book!
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on
Helpful Score: 2
Scott Westerfeld's writing is captivating. I picked this book up without any expectations and ended up reading the whole series. Mr. Westerfeld puts you in the Uglies world and gives you enough detail to let your imagination take over.

Two thumbs up.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 2 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
This is a young adult book but even though I'm old I really enjoyed it. The writing is simple but the story really drew me in and I couldn't put it down. I read the whole thing in a day and a half and immediately came back to order the next books in the series. It kind of reminded me of The Hunger Games. Not quite as good as that but I still loved it. Some fascinating ideas and gives you some food for thought.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on
Helpful Score: 2
I read this book after reading the stellar reviews on PBS as well as a recommendation from a friend... well, I was disappointed by all the hype in this book. The characters are flat and uninteresting. I realize this is a young adult book but it seemed very juvenile. I have heard it compared to Twilight, which I strongly disagree with. The whole book just seems to be a rant agains "pretty" people. I'll pass this one on in hopes that I'm the only one who hated this book!
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on
Helpful Score: 2
Blech, what a waste of time! This author should honestly be ashamed to write something so simple and condescending for young adults. I was so bored I could barely bring myself to finish it. PLEASE save yourself some time and effort and read some worthwhile sci-fi such as Dun or Fahrenheit 451.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 598 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
This is a great book! It is about a future society in a "Stepford-type" world. The main character, Tally, makes mistakes that come with being young, and is growing and changing. It is such a unique story. I thoroughly enjoyed it and I can hardly wait to read the next in the series.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 38 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Wonderful trilogy!! This is the very first book in the uglies series. I am not very into sci-fi, but absolutely LOVED this book. This is up there with my favorite books of ALL TIME.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 4 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Once you get into the story its hard to put down.... This is almost sci-fi but with a chick lit twist.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 73 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
this is a great read for anyone out there who likes a good story and who likes great characters....i was reading it for my niece, to see if she would like it and thought it was one of those novels that was better than STEPHANIE MEYER'S TWILIGT SERIES!!!!
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 23 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
this is the first in a new trilogy--set in the future where everyone at the 16th birthday has surgery to correct any flaws of features, skin everything to end up with a "perfect" self. The idea behind it was so that there would be no advantage to being better looking. As Tally approaches her 16th birthday she meets another teen who shows her a different view of being "ugly".
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 7 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I heard good things about this book so i got it... at first I was like what? It took a few chapters (which I had to make myself read) to get good ... BUT after that I couldnt put it down, now I cant wait for the next one :)
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 9 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Whether it's in a YA novel or not, I always respect an author who can put together a story with such skill at word choice. More words aren't necessary when the right words are used, and it's what makes it such a speedy and exciting read. When I picked this book up, I'd never heard of it before and I admit I didn't really even pay much attention to the description on the back. What a pleasant surprise.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 113 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I thought the world of this book was really creative and made me look at being Pretty in a different way. I am glad that the majority of our population is not of the mindset in this book. I am very intrigued by the twist at the end. The author did a great job alluring me to read on.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 9 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This book was an innovative, eye opening adventure! He does a spectacular job at pulling you into his world of Uglies and Pretties! I particularly enjoyed stepping into the shoes of the brainwashed ignorant 'ugly' as she seems to be pulled into awareness by fate. The story is simple, yet deep, touching on an undeniable struggle we currently see in society. That is the struggle with obsessing over beauty. I'm very excited and look forward to following Tally's journey toward a world that may not be perfect, but is blessed by the flaws of natural humanity.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on
Helpful Score: 1
this series is easily my favorite... and i read all the time... the characters work so well together and the plot and premise keeps you involved. I am a huge fan of Westerfeld and if you are a fan of Uglies, you will enjoy the rest of the series as well as his Peeps series too.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 289 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Uglies is the beginning of a young adult dystopian series with an intriguing premise: what's wrong with everybody perfected with an operation at age sixteen? Fifteen-year-old ugly Tally is eagerly awaiting the operation until she learns about people living outside of the cities, and being forced to infiltrate this renegade group of Smokies when her new best friend Shay runs away to join them. Scott Westerfeld's futuristic dystopian universe raises many questions about our impact on the environment (as Rusties who almost ruined the earth), conformity, and beauty. However, perhaps because it is intended for a young adult audience, these themes seem simplified. Likewise, the plot focuses on one central conflict at one time; Tally can either take this or that fork in the road at each turning point. Nonetheless, since I have the rest of the books, I will continue to read this light, entertaining series.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 2 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I love getting into YA series. Yes I did get started with the Twilight series. I love that there is a theme about superficial things. I also like that I can read a hundred pages, put it down, and come back to it, with the same excitement. I think that the writing is great, and can't understand how a man got into the head of a 15 year old girl!
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 774 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I liked Westerfeld's writing style a lot, enough that I'd like to pick up one of his non-YA SF novels. And I liked this book. However, I would have liked it better if I were around 11 or 12. It reminded me a bit of some of HM Hoover's kids books.
Around 200 years in the future, an apocalypse has occurred (of the non-specified variety). Population has been drastically reduced, and people now live in small, enclosed cities and are told shocking stories of how people in the past lived a destructive, non-environmental lifestyle. (They cut down trees!). Society is rigidly stratified. Young people look forward in anticipation to the day of their Operation - a drastic plastic surgery that will make them beautiful. Until then, they call each other Uglies, insult each other, and dream about how they'll look after that day. After that, of course, they become Pretties, and live in Pretty Town, where they don't associate with Uglies, but live a life of fabulous parties and non-stop fun. In middle age, people settle down and raise children, and then get gracefully old, with more surgeries and life prolongation treatments.
It doesn't sound so bad!
Which, I think, is why Westerfeld had to change the whole hypothesis halfway through the book.
It's impossible to mention this without spoilers - but it's also the main problem with the book. The book is advertised, and it seems like it started out, being about our ideas of attractiveness and individuality, and the importance many people place on their body image. The Ugly/Pretty society depends on the idea that the reason for the surgeries is that uniform beauty (along with a size-controlled population) eliminates racism and prejudice, and allows people to live in harmony.
However, it's discovered that there's a dirty secret - it's discovered that, along with the cosmetic surgeries, the Powers That Be are also giving people a brain surgery to make people happy, non-violent, carefree (and ditzy).
Yep, that's a lot more scary. But it also pretty much nullifies anything that Westerfeld might hve been trying to say about uniform prettiness maybe not being such a good thing. He fails to make that case, and instead brings up a whole other case. And it's not that hard to argue that brain surgery, performed on subjects without their knowledge or consent, to make them easy to manage, is Not A Great Thing.
The other problem I had with the book is a plot thing. The story centers around two friends. One runs away to a group living outside the city, composed of people who haven't had the operation. Special Circumstances, a secret-police force, sends the other one in a spy to find and allow them to eliminate the group, blackmailing the girl with the threat of not being allowed to have The Operation if she fails. However, on the way to find the secret group, the girl encounters a group of environmental rangers from another city, who know about the group, have no desire to eliminate it, and specifically tell her that if life there doesn't work out for her, she could join them in their city and become a ranger herself. So the power of that blackmail should have been effectively eliminated - but it's not even mentioned.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 8 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This book is in the tenn section, but I thought it was a very good read. It makes you think about how important it is in our society to be pretty, but taken to an extreme in the future. It is a very good read and I look forward to reading the rest of the books in the series!
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 1756 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
First off, this was a great book! For teens and adults. (After all, there's a lot of us who are no longer teens, but don't mind or enjoy stuff like this because we know what we could be missing if we acted our age. ;P) I wasn't sure what to expect after the disappointment in the last teen series I read (Twilight) that was hyped, but this one surprised me. Perhaps because the angst in the teens was conditioned as opposed to a couple of overly sniveling ones who are mad at the world.

I think this book may have been written with the intentions of scaring us away from wanting a "perfect" society, but the advances in medicines and technology that are environmentally friendly are pretty amazing. So many of the things the Pretties have provided for them almost make you wishful that we had such peace and harmony as well. And, even though though certain individualisms are given up (which is narcissistically trivial anyway), the people as a whole seem to prosper and are happy in this "Brave New World". I guess a peaceful society, even if it is gained through a type of mind-control for the average pretty, is better off than the chaos, violence and unhappiness humans have created for themselves on a daily basis.

It also appears that the people in Smoke may feel free, but have managed to recreate many of the catalysts for problems we have today in pollutions and respect for other forms of life in their environment. They may seem to recycle everything left over from the previously felled civilizations, but eventually someone always wants to take shortcuts that impact the environment in a negative way. This actually happens when David wants to clear-cut brush to more easily reach scrap metal, but agrees not to after others are concerned about the waste that would be created.

Overall, this book has a lot of things controversial from both sides, and even though it's sci-fi for us, it still gives us a lot to think about.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 7 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I thought this book was really good. At first the concept seemed simplistic, but quickly details added up until it became a really thoughtful and complicated story. I read the whole series, unable to put it down, and found the ending satisfying.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 29 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I thought this was a fantastic book. It was not what I expected but far better. I enjoyed reading the whole series.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 2 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Has a great moral, but also a fast moving plat so it doesn't get overbearing. A fun read you can be glad to share with your kids.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 25 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
What makes this book, and the rest of the series so popular is one thing, its accessiblity. Tally and Shay maybe be from the future, but its a future everyone can invision, and many have indeed tried before. Its a world where everyone is ugly before they turn 16, and pretty is garruanteed after. Tally is your typical teenager, who finds herself dragged into a world that is far different from the one she knows, and slowly starts to unravel the truth from the hype, and in turn think for herself.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on
Helpful Score: 1
Captivating read, although it is targeted to the tween/teen reader- I can honestly say that most readers would probably enjoy this.
Of course it also hooked me into purchasing the rest of the set....
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 129 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
A futuristic teen adventure book that will keep even adult readers enthralled from the first page.

Tally is ready to be pretty. When you turn sixteen in this futuristic world, you are plucked from school and taken to have the "operation" that turns you from an Ugly into a Pretty.

When you're pretty you can do anything. You get to move to New Pretty Town and party all night long if you choose and Tally can't wait to join her friends who have already "turned."

By turn of chance Tally meets Shay. Another "Ugly" like herself who happens to share her birthday. As their friendship grows and they embark on new adventures together, Shay lets Tally in on her secret: She doesn't want to be pretty.

Tally can't understand her new friend's defiance and refuses to run away with her. When the authorities find out that Shay is missing however, they know that Tally is the key to finding her and now Tally must face a choice: Betray her friend, or stay ugly...forever.

I was sad when this book ended. I can't wait to read the second book and I would totally recommend it to any teen who is having issues with how they look or with society's idea of what beauty is. Westerfeld's message is simple, but surprisingly hard to grasp for many youths these days: Embrace diversity and be yourself.

Rave reviews! Five stars!
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 5 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I like this book, I really did. However, unlike in the Harry Potter series, where you're drawn into a world that feels real, this world feels a bit contrived. Maybe the concept wasn't fleshed out enough, or maybe the terminology was too unimaginative. I don't know what it was, really.
The story however, was interesting, and the themes thought provoking. What happens when we become too disconnected from nature? What is the price of making everyone as attractive as they want to be? Is peaceful coexistence worth the loss of freedom?
Despite its shortcomings, I liked this book enough that I am excited to read the other books in the series.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 193 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Really good story of a girl who can't wait until she is 16 so she can have an operation to make her pretty. Very soon she realizes that it might not what she wants at all. Can't wait to read the next in the series, Pretties
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 181 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Imagine a futuristic society where everyone is equally beautiful, thanks to extensive plastic surgery. Interestingly, everyone is also vegetarian, living separate from nature in compact cities with underground factories.

This is the world in which almost-16-year-old Tally lives. She's counting down the days until her birthday when she will be transformed from an "ugly" into a "pretty." Throw in a new friend who doesn't want to be a pretty and soon Tally finds herself struggling between wanting what she's been programmed to want her entire life...and being content with herself.

The messages in this young adult sci-fi aren't very deeply buried, but the story is fascinating nonetheless. This is the first book in a trilogy of four books. That's right, trilogy of four. Don't ask me.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 20 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This book was really great. I am thinking we are the Rusties that are living now. LOL. The writing was wonderful. The storyline was great. The underlying messages are fantastic. I want to get this one for my 15 year old to read. Will read the next one in the line up. Wanna know how it all goes
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on
Helpful Score: 1
I enjoyed this book. It kept me interested and wondering what would happen next. Although this is a young adult level book I am a grandma and enjoyed it. Sometimes I just need a book that's not overly heavy although there is definitely a message the author is trying to convey.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 684 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This book is a real page turner. It is a constant never ending thrill ride that you just cannot put down! This is the first book in the series and trust me, you'll want the others as soon as you start reading this book. A great read especially for those that like to put people into clicks and call people ugly or goth or anything else. They'll see what clicks can cause in the future and how our need to be pretty instead of ugly can really be a turn for the worst, as this book predicts will happen in the future if we keep it up.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on
Helpful Score: 1
Very interesting. I was sort of disappointed at the ending, though. My sister loved it, and read all of the series. I recommend it to teens.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 10 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Great book, great for tweens, my daughter loved it.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 1756 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
First off, this was a great book! For teens and adults. (After all, there's a lot of us who are no longer teens, but don't mind or enjoy stuff like this because we know what we could be missing if we acted our age. ;P) I wasn't sure what to expect after the disappointment in the last teen series I read (Twilight) that was hyped, but this one surprised me. Perhaps because the angst in the teens was conditioned as opposed to a couple of overly sniveling ones who are mad at the world.

I think this book may have been written with the intentions of scaring us away from wanting a "perfect" society, but the advances in medicines and technology that are environmentally friendly are pretty amazing. So many of the things the Pretties have provided for them almost make you wishful that we had such peace and harmony as well. And, even though though certain individualisms are given up (which is narcissistically trivial anyway), the people as a whole seem to prosper and are happy in this "Brave New World". I guess a peaceful society, even if it is gained through a type of mind-control for the average pretty, is better off than the chaos, violence and unhappiness humans have created for themselves on a daily basis.

It also appears that the people in Smoke may feel free, but have managed to recreate many of the catalysts for problems we have today in pollutions and respect for other forms of life in their environment. They may seem to recycle everything left over from the previously felled civilizations, but eventually someone always wants to take shortcuts that impact the environment in a negative way. This actually happens when David wants to clear-cut brush to more easily reach scrap metal, but agrees not to after others are concerned about the waste that would be created.

Overall, this book has a lot of things controversial from both sides, and even though it's sci-fi for us, it still gives us a lot to think about.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 1756 more book reviews
First off, this was a great book! For teens and adults. (After all, there's a lot of us who are no longer teens, but don't mind or enjoy stuff like this because we know what we could be missing if we acted our age. ;P) I wasn't sure what to expect after the disappointment in the last teen series I read (Twilight) that was hyped, but this one surprised me. Perhaps because the angst in the teens was conditioned as opposed to a couple of overly sniveling ones who are mad at the world.

I think this book may have been written with the intentions of scaring us away from wanting a "perfect" society, but the advances in medicines and technology that are environmentally friendly are pretty amazing. So many of the things the Pretties have provided for them almost make you wishful that we had such peace and harmony as well. And, even though though certain individualisms are given up (which is narcissistically trivial anyway), the people as a whole seem to prosper and are happy in this "Brave New World". I guess a peaceful society, even if it is gained through a type of mind-control for the average pretty, is better off than the chaos, violence and unhappiness humans have created for themselves on a daily basis.

It also appears that the people in Smoke may feel free, but have managed to recreate many of the catalysts for problems we have today in pollutions and respect for other forms of life in their environment. They may seem to recycle everything left over from the previously felled civilizations, but eventually someone always wants to take shortcuts that impact the environment in a negative way. This actually happens when David wants to clear-cut brush to more easily reach scrap metal, but agrees not to after others are concerned about the waste that would be created.

Overall, this book has a lot of things controversial from both sides, and even though it's sci-fi for us, it still gives us a lot to think about.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 21 more book reviews
LOve this book~! A futuristic, scary look at what could happen if people continue to focus too much on outer appearence more than morality and character. Very thought provoking. Entire series is fantastic. Not just for kids.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 77 more book reviews
It took me a few chapters to really get in to this book, but once I did I was hooked. If you enjoyed The Hunger Games, you would probably enjoy these too as they have very similar themes.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 5 more book reviews
I love the distopian genre, and this series fits. It captures the reader while making you think about what our world has become and the choices that we as humans make.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 345 more book reviews
Tally wants to become a Pretty so badly! Pretties were once Uglies who had a complete make-over operation and they get to have all the fun. She's been an Ugly for so long and her best friend turned 16 a few months before her time was to come. She missed hanging out with him. They even had matching scars. In the process of her longing to become a Pretty, she meets another Ugly with the same birthday she has named Shay. Shay keeps talking about how she may not want to become Pretty and wants to find The Smoke where a bunch of Uglies live. Shay knows a guy named David who lives there and he is going to take her to The Smoke. This astounds Tally. Who would want to stay an Ugly?

There as so much action in this book. I found it very unique and interesting in a society that COULD exist since we are obsessed with beauty in our culture. I liked how the different situations worked out and loved how the ending made me anticipate the sequel!
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 3 more book reviews
I totally enjoyed this series by Scott Westerfeld. It's a futuristic look at the scientific answers to eliminating, by surgery, the things in a human that cause unhappiness and strife. It centers around one girl who bucks the system and attempts to give back freedom of choice. Book five in this series is coming out in December 2010. This series is actually geared towards teenage girls but I'm older than dirt and enjoyed it anyway. Highly recommended.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 203 more book reviews
Great book. It's over 400 pages, but was a quick read. A realistic Sci-fi novel. Looking forward to the rest of the series.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 1756 more book reviews
First off, this was a great book! For teens and adults. (After all, there's a lot of us who are no longer teens, but don't mind or enjoy stuff like this because we know what we could be missing if we acted our age. ;P) I wasn't sure what to expect after the disappointment in the last teen series I read (Twilight) that was hyped, but this one surprised me. Perhaps because the angst in the teens was conditioned as opposed to a couple of overly sniveling ones who are mad at the world.

I think this book may have been written with the intentions of scaring us away from wanting a "perfect" society, but the advances in medicines and technology that are environmentally friendly are pretty amazing. So many of the things the Pretties have provided for them almost make you wishful that we had such peace and harmony as well. And, even though though certain individualisms are given up (which is narcissistically trivial anyway), the people as a whole seem to prosper and are happy in this "Brave New World". I guess a peaceful society, even if it is gained through a type of mind-control for the average pretty, is better off than the chaos, violence and unhappiness humans have created for themselves on a daily basis.

It also appears that the people in Smoke may feel free, but have managed to recreate many of the catalysts for problems we have today in pollutions and respect for other forms of life in their environment. They may seem to recycle everything left over from the previously felled civilizations, but eventually someone always wants to take shortcuts that impact the environment in a negative way. This actually happens when David wants to clear-cut brush to more easily reach scrap metal, but agrees not to after others are concerned about the waste that would be created.

Overall, this book has a lot of things controversial from both sides, and even though it's sci-fi for us, it still gives us a lot to think about.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 1756 more book reviews
First off, this was a great book! For teens and adults. (After all, there's a lot of us who are no longer teens, but don't mind or enjoy stuff like this because we know what we could be missing if we acted our age. ;P) I wasn't sure what to expect after the disappointment in the last teen series I read (Twilight) that was hyped, but this one surprised me. Perhaps because the angst in the teens was conditioned as opposed to a couple of overly sniveling ones who are mad at the world.

I think this book may have been written with the intentions of scaring us away from wanting a "perfect" society, but the advances in medicines and technology that are environmentally friendly are pretty amazing. So many of the things the Pretties have provided for them almost make you wishful that we had such peace and harmony as well. And, even though though certain individualisms are given up (which is narcissistically trivial anyway), the people as a whole seem to prosper and are happy in this "Brave New World". I guess a peaceful society, even if it is gained through a type of mind-control for the average pretty, is better off than the chaos, violence and unhappiness humans have created for themselves on a daily basis.

It also appears that the people in Smoke may feel free, but have managed to recreate many of the catalysts for problems we have today in pollutions and respect for other forms of life in their environment. They may seem to recycle everything left over from the previously felled civilizations, but eventually someone always wants to take shortcuts that impact the environment in a negative way. This actually happens when David wants to clear-cut brush to more easily reach scrap metal, but agrees not to after others are concerned about the waste that would be created.

Overall, this book has a lot of things controversial from both sides, and even though it's sci-fi for us, it still gives us a lot to think about.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on
Wasn't really sure what to expect with this book but the more I read the more I could't put it down.

The perfect society where only some of us are different and the rest of us are all the same...beautiful, rich and without a care in the world. After all who really wants to make their own decisions about life much easier to let someone else do it for us...right?!
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on
Scott Westerfield's Uglies books have an interesting premise, but felt overly simple in execution. I enjoyed the first book. Our teenage heroine, Tally Youngblood, lives in a post-apocalyptic, post-scarcity, seeming utopia. When each person turns sixteen they are made "pretty". i.e. they are given head to toe plastic surgery and move to "New Pretty Town", a kind of late adolescent Pleasure Island of parties and cocktails and fun and decadence. Kids who haven't yet had the surgery are called "Uglies". Tally wants to be pretty more than anything. If you smell a dystopia looming, you'd be correct. It's creepy as hell, and Tally learns a few things that puncture her pretty-perfect view of the world she was born into. She learns about the big brother-like Secret Police (called Specials) who have been surgically altered to be strong, fast and monstrous. She also learns about, and eventually makes her way to "The Smoke", a camp of deserters who live in the wilderness, un-surgeried. While there, even more sinister facts emerge. The new pretties aren't so up and "bubbly" (and, wow, will you get sick of the word bubbly in the second book) because their lives are now so fabulous, but because they've been essentially lobotomized, and made docile.

This is spooky, potent stuff, and Westerfield tells an exciting tale. But something about it felt overly simple to me. The Specials are completely evil. Which I guess is partly my problem - we have what I call mustache twirling. Evil for evil's sake that delights in its own evil. I mean, they do say they want to preserve their way of life and look what happened before, etc. But they practically kick puppies. Also, the major betrayal and the reaction to it felt off. It's over a boy that Tally's friend liked first. And when he likes Tally better she becomes completely evil. Which is just stupid. The characters are at the service of the plot.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 14 more book reviews
As far as teen dystopian novels go, this is one of the best. The premise of a society where teenagers are made to look like our idealized version of "pretty" is not only innovative and original, but also speaks to the society we live in today. The world is rich and detailed, the tension is legitimate, and issues are deep and thought-provoking. The characters are a little flat and I'll admit I'm not the biggest fan of Westerfeld's writing style, but the content of the story is good enough that I can past that. The ending will leave you hanging, however, so make sure you're ready to commit to reading "Pretties" and "Specials" as well.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 15 more book reviews
I wasn't to sure about this book at the beggining because it was so different from what i am used to reading, but my gosh this book was amazing! It explains everything in detail and it gives you something serious to think about. I can't wait to read the next book in the series!
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 1756 more book reviews
First off, this was a great book! For teens and adults. (After all, there's a lot of us who are no longer teens, but don't mind or enjoy stuff like this because we know what we could be missing if we acted our age. ;P) I wasn't sure what to expect after the disappointment in the last teen series I read (Twilight) that was hyped, but this one surprised me. Perhaps because the angst in the teens was conditioned as opposed to a couple of overly sniveling ones who are mad at the world.

I think this book may have been written with the intentions of scaring us away from wanting a "perfect" society, but the advances in medicines and technology that are environmentally friendly are pretty amazing. So many of the things the Pretties have provided for them almost make you wishful that we had such peace and harmony as well. And, even though though certain individualisms are given up (which is narcissistically trivial anyway), the people as a whole seem to prosper and are happy in this "Brave New World". I guess a peaceful society, even if it is gained through a type of mind-control for the average pretty, is better off than the chaos, violence and unhappiness humans have created for themselves on a daily basis.

It also appears that the people in Smoke may feel free, but have managed to recreate many of the catalysts for problems we have today in pollutions and respect for other forms of life in their environment. They may seem to recycle everything left over from the previously felled civilizations, but eventually someone always wants to take shortcuts that impact the environment in a negative way. This actually happens when David wants to clear-cut brush to more easily reach scrap metal, but agrees not to after others are concerned about the waste that would be created.

Overall, this book has a lot of things controversial from both sides, and even though it's sci-fi for us, it still gives us a lot to think about.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 21 more book reviews
This was about a girl named Tally, her dream was to turn 16 and become beautiful, so she can be with her best friend peris. Only a few months away, she meets Shay, and her life changes. This was a very good, easy read.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 9 more book reviews
thoroughly enjoyed.

If you enjoyed hunger games, you would like this series!
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 3 more book reviews
I have to start by saying that I am a 32 year old. This is NOT the kind of book I normally read but I saw a review for it on PBS that raved about it so I thought I would give it a shot. My goodness, I am glad I did! The plot is very clever - teenagers at the age of 16 are made 'pretties', until then they are 'uglies'. Pretties all look the same and act the same. Some seek a different life. I will not give anything away (hate that!) but the book is rife with interesting commentaries on what is 'pretty', ethical dilemnas, and is very well written. It leaves you wanting more. This book would make an excellent book group selection. I highly recommend it!
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 2 more book reviews
I just recently read this book and I liked it pretty well. It has some good moments, and it's a very easy read. If your also in to futuristic/sci fi books then you should consider reading this.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 48 more book reviews
Really interesting, thought-provoking, and sometimes scary look at a futuristic, high-tech society where all citizens get an extreme makeover when they turn 16. The authorities follow the twisted logic that if everyone looks the same, there will be less for people to fight about. The main character ends up getting involved with an underground colony of resistors. This book will really make you think about what it means to be "beautiful" and how it effects so many things in every person in society.

I can't wait to read book 2, Pretties!
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on
the first page of reading i thought this book was weird and i wasnt going to like it. I was just going to repost it, then i decided to try again and i am sooo glad i did. I love this book. by far one of my favorites!
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 334 more book reviews
In a future world, everyone is turned Pretty when they're 16, so that everyone is equal, and life becomes one big party. It's what all Uglies aspire to be. Tally Youngblood is 3 months away from 16 when she meets Shay. They become friends, and because they share the same birthday, they will turn Pretty together. Until Shay tells Tally of her plan to run away to find the Smoke, a mysterious hidden community where Uglies who don't want to be Pretty live together in the wild, and tries to persuade her to come along. Tally refuses to give up her lifelong dream, but Shay leaves her cryptic directions to the Smoke in case she changes her mind. On Tally's big day, everything changes - but not they way she expects. The Specials, whose existence Uglies and Pretties have heard rumors about that most don't believe, take Tally into custody and force her to make a choice - betray her friend or be Ugly forever.

I was surprised by how much I enjoyed this story. It was a fast read, as I expected a young adult book to be, but it was 1:00 AM when I finally decided I couldn't finish it in one sitting even though I wanted to - I never expected it to hold my attention that long. It has its flaws, the biggest being simplistic plot and language, which when you consider the genre are perfectly acceptable for the target age group. I wish I'd read this in my teens - I would have loved it then. As an adult, it's still enjoyable and though I won't spend money on it (I got a free promotional e-copy of this one), I'll probably look for the sequels in the library.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 2 more book reviews
Great YA book. The first line of the book caught me, I knew I needed to read this book and it was worth it.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 56 more book reviews
Really good for a YA book. I wish there had been books like this when I was a lot younger.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on
When I was first reading it I thought the story started out slow and a little bit boring... it did get better once Tally was forced to be a spy and to enter the adventure of finding the Smoke. It was interesting in this part and I like the story has revealed some secrets of the 'Pretties'.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on
Quick review: It started slow and the MC (Tally) was very unrelatable at the start. But things picked up towards the middle, and the story (and Tally) became much more enjoyable, leaving me wanting more by the end.

Long review: I'm partial to dystopian novels and this one is no exception. It started out slowly for me. Tally is a product of her teachings in this society, full of naivete and judgment about the past. The new friend she meets, Shay, is a much more relatable character, and I found myself rolling my eyes each time they would argue about the pros & cons of being "pretty" vs. being "ugly." I lost count of the number of times they argued about the same exact thing, and it just seemed as though they were beating a dead horse. These were the only two characters who saw any significant amount of page time for the first half of the book, and I found myself relating much more to Shay. I was a little annoyed with Tally.

It wasn't until at least halfway through the book that things picked up for me and started to get much, much better.

*Spoilers ahead*

When Tally finally entered The Smoke, things began to get more intense. I was still a little irritated by her character because her sole reason for going there was to rat out the smokies so that she could be "pretty." I suppose that was a testament to how important this new lifestyle is in this particular society, but I found it more annoying than anything. However, I began to see some redeeming qualities in her when she hesitated to turn in the smokies. And then things got much better from there.

She finally developed her own mind, and she started to see things differently, once she began to think on her own. The rest of the book was great, and I found myself not wanting to put it down. By the end, I couldn't wait to continue on to the next book in the series.

I rated it a 3.5. A 4 would have been a high rating for me, but because of the slow start, I knocked off half a star.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 33 more book reviews
Fun read about the future and pretty vs. ugly.
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 11 more book reviews
I loved this book so much! I cannot believe how great scott westerfeld wrote this book. The people that have this book on their wish list need to go and buy it because once you read it you will absolutly love it. I know i did! I rate this book a 20 out of 10
reviewed Uglies (Uglies, Bk 1) on + 2 more book reviews
Good book, but I prefer his "Midnighters" series.