Book Reviews of The Woman Who Lives in the Earth

The Woman Who Lives in the Earth
The Woman Who Lives in the Earth
Author: Swain Wolfe
ISBN-13: 9780963478900
ISBN-10: 0963478907
Publication Date: 11/1993
Pages: 160
Rating:
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Publisher: Stone Creek Press
Book Type: Paperback
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5 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Woman Who Lives in the Earth on
Helpful Score: 1
My 13 year old daughter and I both liked this book! If everyone can just get along and be nice to each other..the world is so much nicer to be in.
reviewed The Woman Who Lives in the Earth on + 103 more book reviews
A young girl who uses the hidden forms and patterns of the naturaL WORLD TO TRANSFORM HERSELF AS WELL AS HER ENEMIES.Written in resonant, poetic prose,this tale about overcoming fear and hatred.
reviewed The Woman Who Lives in the Earth on + 204 more book reviews
This is a lovely story with prose that is very poetic, a timeless fable about personal power and hope.
reviewed The Woman Who Lives in the Earth on
Editorial Reviews from Amazon.com:

From Publishers Weekly
Originally self-published, Wolfe's disarmingly simple novel, part Aesopian fable, part environmentalist parable, clearly aspires to the timeless, ageless stature of The Little Prince. In a time before the advent of machines, a girl named Sarah and her farmer parents, Aesa and Ada, find their simple life threatened by a drought that has left their valley desperate for water. On a trip to town for supplies, Sarah attracts the attention of a mysterious person known as the Lizard Woman, in whom Sarah strikes a visceral, irrational fear. The Lizard Woman makes Sarah's presence known to three equally mysterious riders, the town's lawkeepers, known as the Triune. Why are they so suspicious of a small child? Maybe they know that Sarah has befriended a magical fox named Marishan Borison, who encourages Sarah's latent abilities to connect with the natural world. Hounded, Sarah must then divine the true source of the drought before the Triune and a mob from town, convinced of her demonic qualities, sacrifice her in a misguided attempt to bring on the rain. Wolfe's unadorned prose pushes this book toward the boundaries of young-adult fiction, as does his rather easy celebration of the virtues of simplicity and childlike wisdom over the fearful, paranoid superstitions of the throng. But the tale, charmingly told, should reawaken readers to the pleasures of allegory.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist
Appealing to readers of many ages, this story is written in the classic fable style. There is a hero, Sarah, a child who is sensitive, curious, and intuitive. There are evil forces, a triune of mean-spirited men, allied with a superstitious woman. There is fear, challenge, journey, and, of course, a happily-ever-after ending. Still, for all its adherence to tradition, this book imparts wisdom and hope, even to the cynical mind, through a fresh perspective on soul and the fluidity of self. As Sarah sees through the eyes of a fox and a hawk, as she reinforces her bond with the natural world to save herself from the villagers, she raises the suspicion of the townspeople, who eventually start a witch-hunt in earnest. Wolfe creates magic, depicts real evil, which is often based on fear, and reawakens not only the human-nature connection or the relation of spirit to flesh, but the whole brilliant, interwoven pattern of soul, self, others, and the natural world. Isn't that worth suspending our disbelief? Janet St. John --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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This is actually a hardcover copy of the book.