Book Review of The Remains of the Day

The Remains of the Day
reviewed on + 289 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2


Don't be fooled by the name: Kazuo Ishiguro emigrated to Britain at age 5 and The Remains of the Day is written in a style completely in keeping with that of an impeccable English butler. In the summer of 1956, Stevens ventures out on a motoring holiday to the West Country when his new American employer is not in residence. During the trip, he ponders over his life in service to Lord Darlington and his working relationship with the former housekeeper, Miss Kenton, whom he calls on towards the end of the journey. As the title implies, the story concerns itself with the past; even very few details of the journey are related as it is happening. This is an intense character study of one who considers himself foremost a consummate professional, as well as a a study of class in British society. There are hints of sadness in this reflective work which I found deserving of its 1989 Booker Prize and a space on the list of 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die.