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Topic: Great books on World War II

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Date Posted: 8/26/2019 9:41 PM ET
Member Since: 9/22/2010
Posts: 5,431
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Here is a quick, easy and enjoyable read about bravery in World War II. I recommend it due to its exposure of information not often found in other World War II books 

Twenty-Five Yards of War

Date Posted: 11/7/2019 12:45 PM ET
Member Since: 9/22/2010
Posts: 5,431
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If you enjoyed reading The Longest Day, then you will also like Death of a Nazi Army, which could almost be considered a sequel to that book.

Death of a Nazi Army, really two German armies, begins with the capture of St. Lo and, then moves on to the breakout at Avranches and Operation Cobra which allowed the breakout. The last 60 pages cover the Falaise Pocket, where the two German armies were destroyed. The link above goes to the book's page and my review.



Last Edited on: 11/7/19 5:12 PM ET - Total times edited: 4
Date Posted: 11/21/2019 8:36 PM ET
Member Since: 9/22/2010
Posts: 5,431
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If you read through some of my entries above, you will realize I am very interested in the code wars of World War II. I just finished Code Girls : The Untold Story of American Women Code Breakers of World War II and wish it had been written decades ago. God, the history it reveals. Over 70% of the thousands of code breakers on the American side were women, college graduates, elementary and highschool math teachers, and so many other occupations. What a wonderful story.

But of all the 'code girls" who served, in my opinion the hardest task probably went to those who worked on the codes of ships at sea on which their brothers, husbands and lovers were stationed. Their job was to monitor the traffic generated by the American military to ensure the fighting men practiced strict security. These women were often the first to know their loved ones' ships had been sunk.

When I began reading the book the paperback version was on the WL of 45 members, and the hardback version more. Now that I've finished the paperback version 40 members still have it WLed.

Date Posted: 1/8/2020 8:36 PM ET
Member Since: 9/22/2010
Posts: 5,431
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The OSS---Office of Strategic Services---was the percursor to the CIA. What the OSS accomplished in World War II was mind-boggling. Especially, when you consider it didn't exist prior to the war. Those OSS agents who served behind enemy lines for days, weeks, months and years, deserve our admiration and thanks. Many of them died in the line of duty, often after terrible hardships, if not torture.

There are many books written about the OSS and its commander. William Donovan was a World War I hero who received the Medal of Honor. He was also a WW II hero.  There are numerous books written about him. However, what I want to do here is recommend a book on the OSS you shouldn't read. Click on the book's title to read my review.  

This Grim and Savage Game



Last Edited on: 1/8/20 8:38 PM ET - Total times edited: 3
Date Posted: 6/30/2020 1:44 AM ET
Member Since: 2/9/2011
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I love Walter Lord's WW2 books. They are nonfiction but the narrative reads grippingly like a novel. 
Highly recommend Miracle of Dunkirk and Lonely Vigil on the Coastwatchers. 

Date Posted: 7/24/2020 1:38 PM ET
Member Since: 9/22/2010
Posts: 5,431
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Wow!  It appears I haven't recommended a WWII history since last November. That doesn't mean I haven't been reading in that genre, just that I didn't consider them "Great Books on WW II." But here is one I really like. Click on the link to read my review. And, if you're still hesitant, read some of the very long reviews on Amazon.

Why The Allies Won by Richard Overy



Last Edited on: 7/24/20 1:38 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 7/29/2020 9:37 PM ET
Member Since: 9/22/2010
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I admit to having a fascination with the U.S. Submarine Service of WWII. As such, a first-person memoir from a submarine captain who received the Medal of Honor for his exploits, which includes time as a Japanese POW, ranks high with me. In Wahoo: The Patrols of America's Most Famous WWII Submarine, Richard O'Kane writes about his experiences on the USS Wahoo as its executive officer for five patrols.



Last Edited on: 7/29/20 9:38 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 9/15/2020 12:32 PM ET
Member Since: 9/22/2010
Posts: 5,431
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Finished another WW II book I consider exceptional.  Corregidor: The Rock Force by E. M. Flanagan. It quickly covers the loss of Bataan and Corregidor early in the war, and then spends most of the book covering the planning of the assualt on Corregidor and the actual attack. One thing which helps make it exceptional is, as even the author mentions, the battle was a very significant event at that time, due to Bataan and Corregidor's importance as morale factors in WW II. However, since then very little is mentioned in the history books about it.



Last Edited on: 9/17/20 8:44 PM ET - Total times edited: 2
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