Book Reviews of Hiroshima

Hiroshima
Hiroshima
Author: John Hersey
PBS Market Price: $8.09 or $4.19+1 credit
ISBN-13: 9780679721031
ISBN-10: 0679721037
Publication Date: 3/4/1989
Pages: 160
Rating:
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 125

4 stars, based on 125 ratings
Publisher: Vintage
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

19 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Hiroshima on
Helpful Score: 3
This is an interesting account of the effects of the atomic bomb on a small number of residents of the title city. It is an unsympathetic rendering which includes a followup which was added forty years later.
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Helpful Score: 1
Fascinating account of survivors one year after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima
reviewed Hiroshima on
Helpful Score: 1
a must read for everyone. well written book of just facts. the author did not put any slant to the book at all. it is simply the survivors stories.
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Helpful Score: 1
recollections of citizens of Hiroshima on what happened on that fateful day
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Helpful Score: 1
A moving journalistic account of the bombing of Hiroshima, Japan.
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Helpful Score: 1
This is a very interesting book...I couldn't put it down!
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Helpful Score: 1
I feel like this book did an excellent job of opening my eyes to the destruction that the bomb dropped on Hiroshima really caused. I admit, the characters can be really confusing, especially in the first and fifth chapters, but in the end it all makes you feel sick to your stomach. The horror that these Japanese citizens had to face.

I am still undecided on whether or not that I believe the bomb should've been dropped. I feel like yes, by it being dropped it was pretty clear that nothing like this should happen again. But at the same time, after taking a Japanese class for two years, I really feel for them and feel like they didn't deserve that.

I think it's amazing that in this book, they are thanking the Americans and they are dying for their Emperor. I love how passionate and loving they are of their country.

This is a must-read book
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Helpful Score: 1
A haunting account from various perspectives. Truly puts a human face on the events that occurred that day and makes you contemplate the true costs of war.
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I loved this book. I never imagined that there were people in Hiroshima who survived, yet many did! It is sad and inspiring to read some of their stories; yet there is hope in this book as any one of us could some day face the unthinkable.
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This is a non fiction book on Hiroshima and the aftermath of the bomb. I liver there in the 50's and my therefore feel a greater affinity for the bookk. I loved it, it was terrible time and people suffered and many died. This catches the humanity in disastrous aftermath.
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John Hersey's first version of Hiroshima was published in 1946. This edition included updates on the six survivors he had originally profiled and was published in 1985. Regular readers of this blog know that I am completely appalled by the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and I see no purpose for any nation or group, particularly one claiming to follow Islam, to possess such weapons. Perhaps the only thing more depressing than the desperate testimonials of these six survivors is how the author interspersed, as the years went by in the lives of the survivors, landmarks in the spread and development of the world's nuclear arsenal, such as the development of the hydrogen bomb and Indian proliferation. Some survivors tried to educate the world on Hiroshima's lesson, namely that humans must end war. Sadly, the world has so far refused to listen.

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A high mark for narrative journalism that hasn't been surpassed since its release.
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Amazing visual images.
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This is a moving account of Hirsohima of the lives of survivors of the nuclear attack on that Japanese city. It is deserving of being included in the category of "classic". It is both moving and insightful. It leaves you in awe of the human condition.
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excellent
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Having been to the Peace Park in Hiroshima recently, I wanted to read about this momentous and horrible event. Hersey's book is a classic: factual, not emotional, full of details that make one realize that we must never as a world drop an atomic bomb on anyone. Hersey wrote this in 1946 and followed the people whose lives he chronicles forty years later in 1986. Highest recommendation.
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A classic.
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This was a short, concise book on the action taken in Hiroshima.
To follow the six or so characters was to see how lives were changed forever. I thought it was thought-provoking and cannot imagine having lived through something such as this and it's aftermath.
reviewed Hiroshima on
"Hiroshima" is a candid and moving magazine article that follows several residents of Hiroshima who experienced the first atomic weapon used in 1945 and the aftermath of the event. The article was published in the New Yorker Magazine in August of 1946, approximately one year after the dropping of the bomb. ( https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1946/08/31/hiroshima ) The book is journalism free of opinion and bias (which is rare today). No judgement is offered, only a careful accurate telling of the experiences of real people amidst apocalypse. I believe that this article is one of the first of examples of what was to become known as "new journalism", and is considered a classic. It is a sobering yet worthwhile read.

ps. A followup article was published 40 years after the event, https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1985/07/15/hiroshima-the-aftermath