Book Reviews of Slave to Fashion

Slave to Fashion
Slave to Fashion
Author: Rebecca Campbell
ISBN-13: 9780345478184
ISBN-10: 0345478185
Publication Date: 3/1/2005
Pages: 336
Rating:
  • Currently 2.9/5 Stars.
 30

2.9 stars, based on 30 ratings
Publisher: Ballantine Books
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

8 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Slave to Fashion on + 22 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I just couldn't get in to this book, I found myself getting bored a lot and didn't finish it.
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Excellent beach reading material! Very light hearted and humorous.
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Fashion maven makes good -- a funny look at maturing.
reviewed Slave to Fashion on + 30 more book reviews
loved this book. was a cute read for a rainy day!
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From Publishers Weekly
Smarter and darker than your average Bridget Jones knockoff, Campbell's first novel is also more mean-spirited, though it adheres closely to the conventions of the Bright English Working Girl Looking for Love formula. Antiheroine Katie Castle suffers a cataclysmic fall from grace followed by scrappy attempts to get back on her feet, and miraculously redeems her professional and romantic life by novel's end. She works for successful designer Penny Moss, whose son, Ludo, she is set to marry. But when word of her fling with a handsome driver reaches Penny, Katie loses everything her job, her flat and her fiance. Katie's snobbishly mordant wit is what distinguishes this book from its many, many sisters, even though her wisecracks are often gratuitously cruel: "the news would spread faster than Ebola in a Congo village." She is, in fact, so utterly awful to everyone that it's difficult to enjoy her eventual victories. There are clever touches Katie taking a job in a sweatshop, a gangster who quotes Nietzsche and Campbell, who runs a clothing design firm with her mother, is most incisive about the bitchy evanescence of the fashion world.
reviewed Slave to Fashion on + 22 more book reviews
Superfun chick lit! Loved it!
reviewed Slave to Fashion on
Just as life seems to be perfect for Katie Castle, one little mistake turns it all around for her, ultimately for the better.
reviewed Slave to Fashion on + 255 more book reviews
A fun read. I didn't find it bitter or nasty -- but then again, I'm a snarky Anglophile and wannabe fashionista. Read an excerpt at RandomHouse.com.

From Publisher's Weekly:
Smarter and darker than your average Bridget Jones knockoff, Campbell's first novel is also more mean-spirited, though it adheres closely to the conventions of the Bright English Working Girl Looking for Love formula. Antiheroine Katie Castle suffers a cataclysmic fall from grace followed by scrappy attempts to get back on her feet, and miraculously redeems her professional and romantic life by novel's end. She works for successful designer Penny Moss, whose son, Ludo, she is set to marry. But when word of her fling with a handsome driver reaches Penny, Katie loses everything her job, her flat and her fiance. Katie's snobbishly mordant wit is what distinguishes this book from its many, many sisters, even though her wisecracks are often gratuitously cruel: "the news would spread faster than Ebola in a Congo village." She is, in fact, so utterly awful to everyone that it's difficult to enjoy her eventual victories. There are clever touches--Katie taking a job in a sweatshop, a gangster who quotes Nietzsche--and Campbell, who runs a clothing design firm with her mother, is most incisive about the bitchy evanescence of the fashion world. This is positioned as a lighthearted romp, but it may be too bitter and nasty to work with the Bridget crowd; still, fashionistas and trendy Anglophiles will love it.