Book Reviews of Sharpe's Enemy: Richard Sharpe and the Defense of Portugal, Christmas 1812

Sharpe's Enemy: Richard Sharpe and the Defense of Portugal, Christmas 1812
Sharpe's Enemy Richard Sharpe and the Defense of Portugal Christmas 1812
Author: Bernard Cornwell
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ISBN-13: 9780140294347
ISBN-10: 0140294341
Publication Date: 4/1/2001
Pages: 351
Rating:
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 16

3.8 stars, based on 16 ratings
Publisher: Penguin Books
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

8 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Sharpe's Enemy: Richard Sharpe and the Defense of Portugal, Christmas 1812 on + 24 more book reviews
EXCITING STORY OF SHARPE'S BATTLE IN THE MOUNTAINS OF PORTUGAL AGAINST THE FRENCH AND HIS OLD ENEMY HAKESWILL.
reviewed Sharpe's Enemy: Richard Sharpe and the Defense of Portugal, Christmas 1812 on + 902 more book reviews
This is the chronological Book 15 (and original Book 6) of the Richard Sharpe series.

Cornwell makes a slight detour with this book by using a location that doesn't really exist as the site for a battle that never actually happened. Instead, it was a story that served to move the series forward. Sharpe found himself in the company of ally and enemy alike, both old and new, and it made for really great reading. The battle was not the typical siege-style campaign of major importance that dominates the plot in so many of the other books, but was something more informal. Because of that, it somehow made this book seem more fun in comparison.

This was a story about Richard Sharpe and a handful of men who go to the Gateway of God on a rescue mission for one woman and end up fighting several battalions of the French army instead. I couldn't help but think that this was something of a Richard Sharpe version of Home Alone... One guy, trapped, fighting off the bad guys with little more than cunning, a few fireworks, and a battle plan written in crayon.

I enjoyed the character development that was provided for Sharpe, and I really liked some of the new characters (Ducos and Fredrickson, for example) who were introduced. This is yet another page-turning installment to the Richard Sharpe series, and one that I could not put down.
reviewed Sharpe's Enemy: Richard Sharpe and the Defense of Portugal, Christmas 1812 on + 12 more book reviews
Excellent book, and an interesting addition to the Sharpe Series.
reviewed Sharpe's Enemy: Richard Sharpe and the Defense of Portugal, Christmas 1812 on + 902 more book reviews
This is the chronological Book 15 (and original Book 6) of the Richard Sharpe series.

Cornwell makes a slight detour with this book by using a location that doesn't really exist as the site for a battle that never actually happened. Instead, it was a story that served to move the series forward. Sharpe found himself in the company of ally and enemy alike, both old and new, and it made for really great reading. The battle was not the typical siege-style campaign of major importance that dominates the plot in so many of the other books, but was something more informal. Because of that, it somehow made this book seem more fun in comparison.

This was a story about Richard Sharpe and a handful of men who go to the Gateway of God on a rescue mission for one woman and end up fighting several battalions of the French army instead. I couldn't help but think that this was something of a Richard Sharpe version of Home Alone... One guy, trapped, fighting off the bad guys with little more than cunning, a few fireworks, and a battle plan written in crayon.

I enjoyed the character development that was provided for Sharpe, and I really liked some of the new characters (Ducos and Fredrickson, for example) who were introduced. This is yet another page-turning installment to the Richard Sharpe series, and one that I could not put down.
reviewed Sharpe's Enemy: Richard Sharpe and the Defense of Portugal, Christmas 1812 on + 674 more book reviews
This volume begins with Mr. Sharpe's career looking up. The careful description of the weapons and strategies then current are always spot on.
As I meet two or three times with high school gals and guys wishing to improve their reading skills enough so they have some confidence in being able to hack junior college, the identity of the unnamed bad guy at the start of this volume was immediately to be guessed and the introduction of Congreve's rocket technology promises an answer to plot complications not immediately apparent.
A good read by Mr. Cornwell.
reviewed Sharpe's Enemy: Richard Sharpe and the Defense of Portugal, Christmas 1812 on + 902 more book reviews
This is the chronological Book 15 (and original Book 6) of the Richard Sharpe series.

Cornwell makes a slight detour with this book by using a location that doesn't really exist as the site for a battle that never actually happened. Instead, it was a story that served to move the series forward. Sharpe found himself in the company of ally and enemy alike, both old and new, and it made for really great reading. The battle was not the typical siege-style campaign of major importance that dominates the plot in so many of the other books, but was something more informal. Because of that, it somehow made this book seem more fun in comparison.

This was a story about Richard Sharpe and a handful of men who go to the Gateway of God on a rescue mission for one woman and end up fighting several battalions of the French army instead. I couldn't help but think that this was something of a Richard Sharpe version of Home Alone... One guy, trapped, fighting off the bad guys with little more than cunning, a few fireworks, and a battle plan written in crayon.

I enjoyed the character development that was provided for Sharpe, and I really liked some of the new characters (Ducos and Fredrickson, for example) who were introduced. This is yet another page-turning installment to the Richard Sharpe series, and one that I could not put down.
reviewed Sharpe's Enemy: Richard Sharpe and the Defense of Portugal, Christmas 1812 on + 902 more book reviews
This is the chronological Book 15 (and original Book 6) of the Richard Sharpe series.

Cornwell makes a slight detour with this book by using a location that doesn't really exist as the site for a battle that never actually happened. Instead, it was a story that served to move the series forward. Sharpe found himself in the company of ally and enemy alike, both old and new, and it made for really great reading. The battle was not the typical siege-style campaign of major importance that dominates the plot in so many of the other books, but was something more informal. Because of that, it somehow made this book seem more fun in comparison.

This was a story about Richard Sharpe and a handful of men who go to the Gateway of God on a rescue mission for one woman and end up fighting several battalions of the French army instead. I couldn't help but think that this was something of a Richard Sharpe version of Home Alone... One guy, trapped, fighting off the bad guys with little more than cunning, a few fireworks, and a battle plan written in crayon.

I enjoyed the character development that was provided for Sharpe, and I really liked some of the new characters (Ducos and Fredrickson, for example) who were introduced. This is yet another page-turning installment to the Richard Sharpe series, and one that I could not put down.
reviewed Sharpe's Enemy: Richard Sharpe and the Defense of Portugal, Christmas 1812 on + 902 more book reviews
This is the chronological Book 15 (and original Book 6) of the Richard Sharpe series.

Cornwell makes a slight detour with this book by using a location that doesn't really exist as the site for a battle that never actually happened. Instead, it was a story that served to move the series forward. Sharpe found himself in the company of ally and enemy alike, both old and new, and it made for really great reading. The battle was not the typical siege-style campaign of major importance that dominates the plot in so many of the other books, but was something more informal. Because of that, it somehow made this book seem more fun in comparison.

This was a story about Richard Sharpe and a handful of men who go to the Gateway of God on a rescue mission for one woman and end up fighting several battalions of the French army instead. I couldn't help but think that this was something of a Richard Sharpe version of Home Alone... One guy, trapped, fighting off the bad guys with little more than cunning, a few fireworks, and a battle plan written in crayon.

I enjoyed the character development that was provided for Sharpe, and I really liked some of the new characters (Ducos and Fredrickson, for example) who were introduced. This is yet another page-turning installment to the Richard Sharpe series, and one that I could not put down.