Book Reviews of American Gods

American Gods
American Gods
Author: Neil Gaiman
ISBN-13: 9780380789030
ISBN-10: 0380789035
Publication Date: 4/2002
Pages: 624
Rating:
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 973

4 stars, based on 973 ratings
Publisher: HarperTorch
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

100 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed American Gods on + 66 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 19
This is one of those books that people either really hate or really love. Myself, I enjoyed it. Some reveiws on Amazon.com review how some readers thought it was hard to get through--somewhat slow. I can understand why people would think that, but I found myself trying to interpret what Gaiman is trying to say. Much symbolism abounds in "American Gods." Not a quick read, but for me, it was worth it.
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Helpful Score: 11
Amazing book. I couldn't put it down. It has one of my favorite passages in any book. You'll love it especially if you like myths and legends.
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Helpful Score: 7
This author has such a gift with words it seemed as if i had read poetry instead of a novel. A thoughtful and horrific view of our america.
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Helpful Score: 7
I know this is blasphemy, but I don't really care for Gaiman's books. I want to love them like I loved his Sandman comics, but I am really rather blase about the novels and short stories. This one seems to be a favorite of everyone who reads it. I thought it was okay. Go figure. Winner of a Nebula award for best novel in 2002.
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Helpful Score: 6
The story itself is entertaining, but I had a hard time getting into it. The second half was better.
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Helpful Score: 6
A young man getting out of prison finds out his wife has just died in a car wreck. He meets a mysterious stranger on an airplane and his whole life changes.

I enjoyed reading this book. The story is choppy at times--jumping around from place to place without a transistion--but it comes together in the end. Overall it was well written and intriguing.
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Helpful Score: 3
A wonderful book, and I believe it will become a literary classic. Even with my very limited knowledge of mythology, I was captivated by this story and the beauty of its telling.
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Helpful Score: 3
American Gods is a good read. Some people say it was a bit choppy and hard to follow, and at times it may have been. But its worth a little confusion at first when it all comes together in the end (well, not all at the end, sometimes its in the middle but you get the drift). Gaiman's development of how the 'birth' of Gods and how they live is an easy concept to grasp, even if he introduces a slew of characters like crazy. The give and take of this book was more give than take, and I recommend the read. Especially if you like mythology, because this book is nothing less than an enriching story of ancient mythology given a modern spin.
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Helpful Score: 3
This is one of the best books I've read...PERIOD! Neil Gaiman weaves a story of a man just out of prison trying to get his life in order and discovering his life is not what it seems. Also a commentary on our dying faith in America and how it effects us and the beings that once were worshipped. A great read. It works on many emotional levels. If you liked the Sandman comic books and graphic novels, you'll probably LOVE this book. Can't say enough good things about it.
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Helpful Score: 3
A very different kind of story. A cross between science fiction and action. I didn't think I'd like it, but I enjoyed it in the end. Some parts a little graphic.
reviewed American Gods on
Helpful Score: 2
This is a really well written book. There are some very nice, sudden twists in the plot that will leave your head spinning. The story is a take on the fate of the gods in the modern world. The plot weaves together tightly and cleanly and is a must read for anyone who is interested in mythology. For me, this is not a repeat read like Dune or Mists of Avalon, but your mileage may vary.
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Helpful Score: 2
This is an amazing book. Gaiman's writing reminds me a little of Clive Barker. You become immersed in the new world he has created and actually can believe this is happening. There is a dark feel to this, although that is not a negative comment. It just adds to the ambiance that Gaiman is developing through out the book. Recommend highly! I read it and then I had to re-read...really a fabulous book.
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Helpful Score: 2
An unusual story, but very compelling. I couldn't put it down.
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Helpful Score: 2
Amazon.com's Best of 2001
American Gods is Neil Gaiman's best and most ambitious novel yet, a scary, strange, and hallucinogenic road-trip story wrapped around a deep examination of the American spirit. Gaiman tackles everything from the onslaught of the information age to the meaning of death, but he doesn't sacrifice the razor-sharp plotting and narrative style he's been delivering since his Sandman days.

Shadow gets out of prison early when his wife is killed in a car crash. At a loss, he takes up with a mysterious character called Wednesday, who is much more than he appears. In fact, Wednesday is an old god, once known as Odin the All-father, who is roaming America rounding up his forgotten fellows in preparation for an epic battle against the upstart deities of the Internet, credit cards, television, and all that is wired. Shadow agrees to help Wednesday, and they whirl through a psycho-spiritual storm that becomes all too real in its manifestations. For instance, Shadow's dead wife Laura keeps showing up, and not just as a ghost--the difficulty of their continuing relationship is by turns grim and darkly funny, just like the rest of the book.

Armed only with some coin tricks and a sense of purpose, Shadow travels through, around, and underneath the visible surface of things, digging up all the powerful myths Americans brought with them in their journeys to this land as well as the ones that were already here. Shadow's road story is the heart of the novel, and it's here that Gaiman offers up the details that make this such a cinematic book--the distinctly American foods and diversions, the bizarre roadside attractions, the decrepit gods reduced to shell games and prostitution. "This is a bad land for Gods," says Shadow.

More than a tourist in America, but not a native, Neil Gaiman offers an outside-in and inside-out perspective on the soul and spirituality of the country--our obsessions with money and power, our jumbled religious heritage and its societal outcomes, and the millennial decisions we face about what's real and what's not.
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Helpful Score: 2
This is an absolutely excellent piece of fiction. It's one of those books you need to read more than once because you can't possibly absorb it all the first time. After you've gone to look up some of the gods and goddesses used in the story, you should definitely pick the book up again. I've read it three times and have 100% enjoyed it each time. Neil Gaiman is a marvelous storyteller.
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Helpful Score: 2
I enjoyed this book more than I thought I would. It sat on my shelf for more than a year as I pondered whether to read it or not. It is a rather dark read but is not a horror story, more just dark fantasy. If about eight unnecessary pages were deleted the book would have been better. What made the story interesting for me where all the stories, myths, legends within the story. Gaiman did his homework.

The premise is that when people emigrated or were brought to American they brought their "gods" with them and then the gods were abandoned for new gods. The old gods and the new gods planned a war... But there are many twists and turns in the story that keep the reader wonder what is going to happen next.

I don't know if I would read it again because it is a dark read, but I am glad that I gave it a go.
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Helpful Score: 1
A very different read as compared to the stream-line mass media in print these days. I enjoyed this book as it aligns with a philosophy of how we manifest our own destiny - through thought. That explanation is much deeper than the fun read of the book. Intriging - I found myself looking forward to each nightly reading, and finished quickly. Fun.
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Helpful Score: 1
The beginning of this book had me thinking I was not really going to like it much-it is written well-but the subject matter is really out there. It is about people's beliefs in their gods bringing those gods to America from their "old country". While it takes place in present time, it visits back through time touching on a particular event here and there that brought certain gods to this country. In the present, those beliefs fade and there develops a kind of "turf war" between the older gods and the new generation. It turns out to be a very compelling road trip throughout America with some spooky moments and in the end is a great story! I really liked it overall!
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Helpful Score: 1
I did not know what to expect when I started reading this book as I had not read any reviews. I had heard Neil Gaiman was a terrific writer: and he is! I did not know this was a fantasy novel when I began reading, though it soon became apparent. But, if you are not a fan of fantasy, don't let that put you off. It was an absorbing read, regardless.
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Helpful Score: 1
Gaiman is at the top of his game. an excellent book!
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Helpful Score: 1
This is a gritty look at the world of forgotten gods, who must resort to lives as cab drivers and such, because they are not worshipped anymore. The down-on-his-luck protagonist stumbles into this world and finds himself a willing pawn in an endgame. It's an odd juxtaposition of modern real-world life and fantasy. To enjoy the book, you have to suspend disbelief to accept the fact that the lead character takes this all in stride, and just goes along with everything. A more realistic character would have struggled with doubts about his mental health or at least put up bit of a fight. That was my only problem with this book. I think that journey into fantasy could have been handled more effectively without losing the impact. But that's being extremely nitpicky. This will probably appeal more to those who are into dark comic/adventure books. Sort of a guy thing. My husband is loving the book. I knew he would.
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Helpful Score: 1
One of the most gripping and dynamic stories I've read in a while!
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Helpful Score: 1
A great book. Nebula and Hugo winner. In it, the hero (Shadow) is employed by Mr. Wednesday after the death of Shadow's wife. We follow Shadow as he and Wednesday travel around the US recruiting. Lots of mythology in here, but bundled up into our world now. An excellent read and a lot of fun. If you like works by Roger Zelazny this is probably going to appeal to you.
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Helpful Score: 1
Dreadful. Awful book that so many others had suggested I'd love, so I bought it, and hated it. Gaiman thinks he's clever with thinly veilled "Surprises" that I saw through 300 pages before they were "revealed" and were supposed to make a difference, but didn't.
Even though I want to get rid of this piece of crap book, I couldn't recommend it to a human. Maybe if you need paper to start fires with, the book could be useful.
Don't read this thing.
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A good book, Gaiman has done quite a bit of research on gods from different ideologies, and folded it all into this book. The main character is getting out of jail, and finds out his wife has been killed. He is recruited by a shady character, and the story follows as his eyes are opened more and more to what has been around him, but he just did not realize (or notice).

A good read if you like mythology, and don't mind some parts of the book where you feel like there is more going on than the author is writing, but you haven't been given all of the information. You'll get the whole story by the end, promise.

It is NOT a mystery, but more like a "coming of age" story. Shadow (protagonist) is likable, and you really feel for him. Gaiman does a great job of giving the characters, even some of the more minor characters, a depth that many other writers never do.
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This is an outrageously good story. A wonderful book. I swear many many times I had to put it down and go "What would it be like to live inside this mans head" The things he brought to life were just crazy and fantastic. I was amazed with every turn. I loved all the stories within the stories, and for a longer book, they helped to keep it from getting boring. Not that a book like this could be. I'm so glad I decided to read it.

I recommend it to one and all.
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* * ½*. Fantastique. When I began reading this book, the premise seemed promising; I thought this would be a real page-turner. A man finds himself in the midst of a battle between old gods long forgotten and new gods. Whoa! Seemed like heavy stuff. The narrative is good. Shadow's whimsical sarcastic sense of humor had me laughing out loud at times (most memorable was the scene where he meets the raven). The book reminded me of Clive Barker's early fantastique novels (Weaveworld, Great and Secret Show, Imajica) where ordinary people became embroiled in matters involving other worlds. The problem with American Gods was there really was no plot so much as a pattern: 1.) Hear about the upcoming storm 2.) Move to a new location 3.) Hide 4.) Get discovered. 5.) Repeat.
So, along the way, we meet interesting characters (human and non-human), but nothing happens to propel the story forward. The only reason that I didn't quit the book early is because Shadow is a likable character and you do want to know how certain relationships end, if they do at all.

3/4's of the way, Gaiman finally writes "And so the storm began." I won't say anything about the storm, other than "That's it!?" But Mr. Gaiman could have turned a great premise into a cool book.
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My first book by Neil Gaiman, after hearing alot about him. This was an absolutely fantastic read. Interesting characters and a great story. If you don't enjoy fantasy/sci fi, this might not be your thing, but I'd highly recommend this book.
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It's a bit rough around the edges, but never fails to entertain. This was the first Gaiman work that I read and it made me want to read more. He's got a wicked sense of humor and uses the macabre in a way that's not hokey.
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I did not know who Neil Gaiman was a few years ago when I found this book. Someone had simply left it for the taking, and it was in all right shape so I picked it up. Fantasy is not my main genre, but this is so well-written, with good characters, that I really liked it a lot, enough to pick up other Gaiman books later.
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The main character is a man called Shadow. He just made it out of prison and is excited to get home to his wife. Unfortunately, the night before he's released he finds out his wife died in a car accident with his best friend. Now Shadow has no ties to the real world, and he makes the acquaintance of a business man named Mr. Wednesday, who offers Shadow a job. Through Mr. Wednesday Shadow meets many strange and unusual people, but the funny thing is that Shadow seems to fit in with them.
I know there are a lot of metaphors and religious messages in this book, but don't look at me for what they are because I was not thinking that deeply while I read it. Mostly I enjoyed the book. The only time I didn't was when I felt I was supposed to know the people/Gods that Shadow or Mr. Wednesday were talking to. I felt a little confused at the ending; it felt like there was too many people in the pot.
As a character, I liked Shadow and related to him through most of the book except(warning this may spoil the ending for you) when he returns at the end. I just couldn't understand why he would come back after being done with the world. I just didn't see it happening.
In the end, I enjoyed the story and the characters, and I would read the sequels and short stories connected to American Gods.
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Very enjoyable - a fun, novel, Stephen King-like mythology. I found the ending a little bit predictable.
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I could not put it down. In fact, I'm thinking about reading it again and I'm not a re-reader.
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I enjoyed American Gods even though fantasy is not a usual genre for me. Shadow is about to be released from prison, but the wife and quiet life he looked forward to is upended by her sudden death in a car accident. Starting with his plane ride back from prison, there's a falling-through-the-rabbit-hole feel to his new adventures. Gaiman's prose is inspired, keeping the reader motivated to follow along with Shadow in what can be interpreted as a deeply allegorical tale. An American mythology, even. Instead of a slew of unanswered questions, I left with an appreciation of Gaiman's craft.
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A strange book. Very, very strange. Hard to get into, even harder to describe. Yet I came away from it with a deep sense of satisfaction. The writing was excellent, the story very descriptive and detailed. Full of American icons, i.e. fast food. Suspend all belief in reality and let the plot wash over you. D.
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Clever story concept with some genuine surprises in the plot.
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I must sing praises of American Gods.
It it.....just fantastic. Every book I've read since then pales in comparison.
I highly recommend it to you, to your friends, to EVERYONE. It's wonderfully imaginative and while reading it, I really felt like I was there, and I really felt and cared for all the characters.
Read it. Best tip I could give you today.
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DH just finished it and can't wait to re-read it. He felt it is an "important" book.
I'm hoping to have a chance to read it before he grabs it back.

Its a lo-o-o-o-ng book but worth the read.
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I'm not quite sure what to say about American Gods. It's a bizarre, yet very good book. The main character, Shadow, is waiting out his last days in prison only to find out his wife was killed in a car accident. On his way to the funeral, he meets an interesting character on the plane who knows way too much about Shadow, and the mysterious man offers him a job. Shadow finds himself caught in the middle of a war between the various gods of America - the gods of the past, brought over with the hopes and dreams of the immigrants, and the gods of an increasingly modern society - television, the internet, etc. This book makes you want to cheer for the good guys, but then again, who is really good, and how can we know? This was my first exposure to Gaiman; I'd heard about him many times over, but had never actually picked up a book by him. I think I'll pick up more, and I encourage you to do so too. This is a good, albeit bizarre and strange, book.
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It keeps you glued to the pages, but it's Neil Gaiman; I'd expect nothing less.
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Shadow gets out of prison early when his wife is killed in a car crash. At a loss, he takes up with a mysterious character called Wednesday, who is much more than he appears. In fact, Wednesday is an old god, once known as Odin the All-father, who is roaming America rounding up his forgotten fellows in preparation for an epic battle against the upstart deities of the Internet, credit cards, television, and all that is wired. Shadow agrees to help Wednesday, and they whirl through a psycho-spiritual storm that becomes all too real in its manifestations. For instance, Shadow's dead wife Laura keeps showing up, and not just as a ghost--the difficulty of their continuing relationship is by turns grim and darkly funny, just like the rest of the book.
Brilliant novel, great writing, although I like Neverwhere better.
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Really good book. I love the way the "old" gods were incorporated into modern day and the fight between the gods of our forefathers and the gods of our children. Makes you look at the evolution of our dieties in a whole new way. I very much recoment this book.
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An extremely popular book right now, and it was an entertaining read.
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Couldn't get into this fantasy in which a man recently released from prison is sucked into what appears to be a battle between ancient gods and newcomers.
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I really enjoyed this book it is wacky and probably one of Gaiman's best. Lots of humor and supernatural events to keep the plot rolling. Similar to some of Christopher Moore's work.
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American Gods is Neil Gaiman's best and most ambitious novel yet, a scary, strange, and hallucinogenic road-trip story wrapped around a deep examination of the American spirit. -- Amazon.com

"Mystery, satire, sex, horror, poetic prose -- AMERICAN GODS uses all these to keep the reader turning the pages." -- Michael Dirda, The Washington Post

"A crackerjack suspense yarn . . . juicily original . . . Wagnerian noir." -- Salon.com

". . . By turns thoughtful, hilarious, disturbing, uplifting, horrifying and enjoyable -- and sometimes all at once." -- St. Louis Post-Dispatch
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This is a sci-fi book, is not the type book I normally read. I think someone who is a fan of this genre would enjoy this book.
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Amazing fantasy with lots of philosophy involved. Sympathetic characters, a roller-coaster ride!
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A real favorite... Fascinating, a tour de force. It was top of my list until I read "Neverwhere."
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I just love Neil Gaiman and this story doesn't disappoint. I couldn't put the book down!
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Couldn't get into this one, never finished it.
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I liked this book very much. It was nice to see some of the Norse gods getting some attention.
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This book is all over the place. A new setting almost every chapter, along with new characters. I never saw one character long enough to care what happened to him. It just didn't hold my interest.
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I absolutely love Neil Gaiman and in my opinion this is his best work. It was very thought provoking and I loved the way he used symbolism and foreshadowing through the book. In the usual Neil Gaiman fashion there is also quite a bit of sarcastic humor thrown in, which I also enjoyed.
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It's Gaiman, but I really preferred Good Omens to this.

Sometimes it seems that this book is taking itself much too seriously.
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Most of the reviews are raving and this book has won SO many awards. However, I thought the character development was weak and the insertion of short stories made the book wander too much for me. I actually liked the short stories better than the weak plot.
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Excellent book -- quite the metaphysical adventure. The idea that the gods of world came to america(s) with the immigration of their people is powerful (and true from a Western Esoteric Tradition perspective). The battle with the gods of technology we have created is on! I loved this book.
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Wow. What a wonderful ride. American Gods is a Hugo and Nebula award winning novel, and thats probably the biggest reason I picked the novel up. Typically, I find the award winners good, but not great, as my tastes never do seem to match the voting bodies for those awards.

But this book? This book was astounding. I was enthralled the whole time (its a long book), never found any part of the plotting predictable, was thoroughly engaged by the characters, and had a fantastic, wild ride.

Its the story of Shadow, an ex-con widower who finds himself in the employ of an elder god (Odin), whos trying to prevent the destruction of the old gods by the new gods. (Old gods are the traditions brought by immigrants to America, and come from many mythologies. New gods are things like TV, Automobile, and so on: the things that Americans today seem to worship more than any other.) All the gods seem to have day jobs, and live in the world with the rest of us.

This setup let Gaiman go crazy with mixing together of all the old mythologies, and also brought the gods down to earth and made them approachable. The end result of that is a wonderful, understated comic mix of it all.

But Gaiman has a serious story to tell, a quest of sorts, and that quest propels the reader through the novel at a breakneck pace. I loved it.

Highly recommended. 5 of 5 stars.
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I liked the main charachter Shadow because he always stayed calm in the face of surprising magic.
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The longest of Gaiman's books. The author likes to play with myths and legends, and it can be difficult to keep up with the characters. A good read.
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Although I liked characters and the basic premise of the book, I found the ending to be a let down, and the promise of the great battle between the gods was never really delivered.
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Peter Straub said "Masterful Storytelling". Absolutely true, an amazing book! This book was a New York Times bestseller and the author has won many awards, among them the World Fantasy Award and the Bram Stoker Award. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch said "By turns thoughtful, hilarious, disturbing, uplifting, horrifying and enjoyable". All true, a not miss book.
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Great read - flows nicely - excellent summer reading!
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Back Cover Synopsis:
Shadow is a man with a past. But now he wants nothing more than to live a quiet life with his wife and stay out of trouble. Until he learns that she's been killed in a terrible accident.

Flying home for the funeral, as a violent storm rocks the plane, a strange man in the seat next to him introduces himself. The man calls himself Mr. Wednesday, and he knows more about Shadow than is possible.

He warns Shadow that a far bigger storm is coming. And from that moment on, nothing will ever be the same...

What the back cover didn't say:
The back cover explanation really says absolutely nothing. This book is about what happens when immigrants come to American, a basically godless country and what happens to their own gods when people stop believing in them. New gods come to being: the TV, the Media, Technology.

What I didn't like: Shadow is just a stupid name for a man. Also, the dead wife/walking corpse just seemed a bit pointless although she did take care of all the dirty business for Shadow.
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Read it in three days when I first got it. Stayed up all night all three nights. Have read it many times since then. Met my own girl Sam. Best Novel Ever.
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Shadow is a man with a past. Flying home for his wife's funeral, as a violent storm rocks the plane a strange man sits next to him, knowing way too much about Shadow.
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Absolutely wonderful! This was my first Neil Gaiman novel and I can't wait to read all his works!
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Neil Gaiman's magic realist journey through the American heartland. A b eutiful and heartbreaking book.
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If you like Norse gods, and mythology in general - this is an interesting read - a bit long, however.
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Gods and Godesses come to life--and death--as they struggle for existence, aided by Shadow, an ex-con trying to get away from his past.
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This book is pretty good. Very interesting characters, completely original plot-line. Definitely worth a read - you won't get bored reading it!!
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A thrilling and thought-provoking read, this book has all the best elements of fantasy, mystery, thriller... Gaiman is a master of playing with the scale of things, making roadside attractions into sacred places and gods into chain-smoking everyday Joes. Kind of a mind-blower.
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one of my fav books
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potato chip book - not the greatest literature, but a fun read
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One of my favorite books, by one of my favorite authors. I fell in love with the characters. This book fell right in line with my new obsession of the magical realism genre.
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I felt American Gods was well written and I loved the concept - What happens to gods when people no longer believe in them? Maybe I was expecting too much as this was my first Gaiman novel and I had heard rave things about his writings, but I found it lacking. I felt the gods could have had more dimension. Overall, not a bad book, but I was disappointed.
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Interesting, if not enjoyable. Gaiman is perhaps a bit too graphic for my taste.
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This book is simply incredible. I read it over the course of a few days (in transit to work, though it was a struggle to start work rather than read it!), and it was just so good, I had to re-read it as soon as I finished it. Dramatic and deep, Gaiman is an incredible author.
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This is a writer you could get addicted to!
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An excellent story of old gods, new gods, and a mortal man stuck in their games.
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Very imaginative work, and includes a lot of folklore references.
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Creative and surprising.
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I loved this book the moment I started reading it. I felt the story flowed even better than Gaiman's other smash novel, Neverwhere. This is one of my favorite novels, but somewhere along the way, I must have lent it to a friend and never got it back! Had to find it and order it again. Such an excellent book! Once I get another copy, I'm never letting it out of my possession again. It's books like this one that you have to hold on to if you love it, because if you have like-minded friends and they "borrow" it from you, you can kiss that copy goodbye!
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Ugh. I didnt get past 30-40 pages. Im not a particularly prudish (or even particularly visual) reader, but every few pages had sex scenes or imagery that was simultaneously depraved and cartoonish, like something out of an adolescent boys imagination. This struck me as tawdry and gratuitous. Perhaps it wasnt, ultimately, but it turned me off enough not to want to find out.
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I found this book to be incredibly compelling. Seriously good yarn.
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Interesting...a little confusing.
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Mu husband really liked this book but I just couldn't get into it.
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I love mythology, but this book tended to drag on. While it was interesting in part, the only reason I kept reading was because it was located mostly in my home state of Wisconsin. The premise was good, but it simply wasn't that engaging.
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From a modern writer, comes a "tall tale" that will keep you interested right up to the end. Shadow is a man with a past who just wants to live quietly with his wife, and stay out of trouble.
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Amazing book!
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Neil Gaiman -- what can I say?
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I found this book. I just could not get into it. Seems to be a little like Stephen King's writing.
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Could not get through this one.
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This book was disturbing on many levels. I hated to finish it.
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This is the first Neil Gaiman book I've read. I didn't like it much. I found it very silly
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After three years in prison, Shadow has done his time. But as the days, then the hours, then the hours, then the seconds until his release tick away, he can feel a storm building. Two days before he gets out, his wife Laura dies in a mysterious car crash, in apparently adulterous circumstances. Dazed, Shadow travels home, only to encounter the bizarre Mr Wednesday claiming to be a refugee from a distant war, a former god and the king of America. Together they embark on a very strange journey across the States, along the way solving the murders which have occurred every winter in one small American town. But they are being pursued by someone with whom Shadow must make his peace... Disturbing, gripping and profoundly strange, Neil Gaiman's epic new novel sees him on the road to finding the soul of America.
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Another great book by Gaiman
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This has won all sorts of awards, but I can't understand why...

I read Gaiman's "Neverwhere," and liked it very much, so I decided to read this one. Mistake. The problem is that none of the characters are likeable, and the author pounds home curse words like there's no tomorrow. Now, I'm no prude, but what does it prove to have the characters cursing in almost every paragraph?

I managed to finish Chapter 5 and then put the book, something I haven't done since Book 4 of The Wheel of Time (but at least I got further along in that book before the annoyances overwhelmed me).

Be warned that there are some sex scenes, although thankfully, there aren't that many of them (at least not through Chapter 5).

Would I have liked this if I persisted until the end? Perhaps. But when there are a lot of books to choose from out there, why should I bother with one that irritates and bothers me?

If you like this kind of dark stuff (it's unrelenting in parts), then have a ball with it.
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Shadow is a man with a past. Hes flying home to the funeral of his wife. A stranger sits next to him on the plane who knows more about Shadow than he should,
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Shadow is a man with a past. Bust now he wants nothing more than to live a quiet life with his wife and stay out of trouble. Until he learns that she's been killed in a terrible accident.

Flying home for the funeral, as a violent storm rocks the plane, a strange man in the seat next to him introduces himself. The man calls himself Mr. Wednesday, and he knows more about Shadow than is possible.

He warns Shadow that a far bigger storm is coming. And from that moment on, nothing will ever be the same...