Book Reviews of Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate)

Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate)
Like Water for Chocolate - Como Agua para Chocolate
Author: Laura Esquivel, Carol Christensen (Translator), Thomas Christensen (Translator)
ISBN-13: 9780385474016
ISBN-10: 0385474016
Publication Date: 1994
Pages: 241
Rating:
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 294

3.8 stars, based on 294 ratings
Publisher: Anchor
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

28 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 51 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This style of writing was new to me, yet I longed for more after I was finished. Well developed characters. You will laugh, hold your breathe, and cry. Take a chance on this book, and you will not be disappointed.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 336 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
A novel, made to read one section each month. With tall-tales, fairy-tails, soap-opera romances, Mexican cookbook and home-remedy handbook all rolled into one.

Savory, tasteful, and satisfying.

... Side Note: If you liked or loved this book then you'll scream-out in shear pleasure over her other bok "The Law Of Love" which comes with visually stunning illustrations and also provides and auditory experience as well as it comes with a music CD.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 87 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I love, love, love this book! I've re-read it probably five times. I can't help but get sucked into the tragic love story, and it's a wonderful translation from the Spanish - much more accessible than, say, Love in the Time of Cholera.

Tita is the youngest of three daughters, living on her tyrant mother's farm in Mexico. As tradition dictates, Tita will never marry, but must care for her mother until she dies. This seems all the more unfair when Tita falls in love. Knowing that she cannot break tradition, her love marries her ugly, fat, undesirable sister, Rosaura, in an attempt to be near Tita, the girl he really loves. When eldest sister, Gertrudis, bucks tradition for her own love, Tita's world suddenly seems less black and white than ever before.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 104 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
A romantic tall tale, very enjoyable read
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 3 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Loved this book. An easy quick read. Don't be thrown off by the cheesy Spanish movie made on this book.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 28 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Enjoyed this very much. Came to it from seeing the movie. Loved the recipes in the movie (one of the cooking genre that includes Babette's Feast and Eat Drink Man Woman) and in the book. A really good read.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 12 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
What a phenomenal novel! I loved every last page. The author blends recipes, love stories and mystical moments like no other. I highly recommend this book to anyone!
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 8 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
A fun and light read. Interesting that they include recipes in the book itself. A foodie would really enjoy this book.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 2 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Too much Fun! Book way better than the movie! Don't forget the chocolate while reading.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 41 more book reviews
A classic. Rent the movie with your honey after reading it.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 11 more book reviews
This is a lovely tale set in Mexico. It is sensual and very entertaining. It explores forbidden love as well as food and how it can express emotions.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 37 more book reviews
I was surprised at the writing style...loved it
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 48 more book reviews
i love girlie movies, and i bet i would like this in movie format. however, i just could not get into this book. what i did read was humorous and well-written, just not my style.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 11 more book reviews
One of the strangest books I've ever read. Reminds me of a Mexican soap opera. (You know, the ones that sometimes make NO SENSE AT ALL?)
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 363 more book reviews
A very interesting read. The recipes were an added treat. But I think I may have liked the movie just a tad more than the book.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 43 more book reviews
I think that I was the only one who never saw the film version of this book. I was more intrigued with how they wove the recipes and food into the book and also with the installment quality that it had. This book is racy, but tame compared to many trashy beach novels. It was an okay read, I suppose, but I wouldn't give it a standing ovation. I must say I'd rather not see the film if it's the same as or worse than the graphic portions of the novel.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 20 more book reviews
An amazing story of Unrequited Love
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 22 more book reviews
I absolutely adore this book!.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 130 more book reviews
Earthy, magical, and utterly charming, this tale of family life in turn-of-the-century Mexico became a best-selling phenomenon with its winning blend of poignant romance and bittersweet wit. The classic love story takes place on the De la Garza ranch, as the tyrannical owner, Mama Elena, chops onions at the kitchen table in her final days of pregnancy. While still in her mother's womb, her daughter to be weeps so violently she causes an early labor, and little Tita slips out amid the spices and fixings for noodle soup. This early encounter with food soon becomes a way of life, and Tita grows up to be a master chef. She shares special points of her favorite preparations with listeners throughout the story.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 115 more book reviews
"A tale tale, fairy tale, soap opera, romancce, Mexican cookbook all rolled into one."
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 72 more book reviews
A tall tale, fairy-tale, soap opera, romance, Mexican cookbook and home remedy handbook all rolled into one. -San Francisco Chronicle
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 51 more book reviews
Excellent book! I read it years ago and I still remember the "feeling" I had while reading it.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 1098 more book reviews
I had forgotten how much fun this book might be. Years ago I saw and enjoyed the movie but had not yet read the book written by Esquivel. The movie won ten awards. Unique in its approach, this is the story of a passionate love affair between Tita and Pedro. Thwarted by Mama Elena, her mother, Tita pours all the love she has into her cooking. It is traditional, her mother says, that the youngest daughter stay unmarried to take care of her mother until she dies. To assure that Pedro is unattainable she bullies him into marrying her daughter, Rosaura. However, with the emotion Tita pours into her culinary creations, strange events occur. Guests at the wedding of Pedro and Rosaura experience food poisoning, a sister runs stark naked into the community and is taken by a revolutionary officer on his horse and they both ride away, and when Rosaura and Pedro's daughter, Esperanza, is married the guests become most amourous and leave the wedding early. Truly enjoyed this story and recommend it to anyone who enjoys strange occurrences, ghosts, and visions as created by this talented Mexican author.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 19 more book reviews
Charming interpretation of life in the turn-of-the-century Mexico. "Part fantasy, part cookbook, part comedy and wholly romantic, "Like Water for Chocolate" is a savory recipe to enjoy." Johnny Depp starred in the movie adaptation.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 201 more book reviews
USA Today said: "A mystical Mexican love story...{that} will charm the palate and the heart."
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 80 more book reviews
Ahhhh...
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 113 more book reviews
Being a happily married person, I had a hard time reading about all the infidelity. Well written and I liked the food metaphors.
reviewed Like Water for Chocolate (Como Agua para Chocolate) on + 63 more book reviews
From Publishers Weekly:
Each chapter of screenwriter Esquivel's utterly charming interpretation of life in turn-of-the-century Mexico begins with a recipe--not surprisingly, since so much of the action of this exquisite first novel (a bestseller in Mexico) centers around the kitchen, the heart and soul of a traditional Mexican family. The youngest daughter of a well-born rancher, Tita has always known her destiny: to remain single and care for her aging mother. When she falls in love, her mother quickly scotches the liaison and tyrannically dictates that Tita's sister Rosaura must marry the luckless suitor, Pedro, in her place. But Tita has one weapon left--her cooking. Esquivel mischievously appropriates the techniques of magical realism to make Tita's contact with food sensual, instinctual and often explosive. Forced to make the cake for her sister's wedding, Tita pours her emotions into the task; each guest who samples a piece bursts into tears. Esquivel does a splendid job of describing the frustration, love and hope expressed through the most domestic and feminine of arts, family cooking, suggesting by implication the limited options available to Mexican women of this period. Tita's unrequited love for Pedro survives the Mexican Revolution the births of Rosaura and Pedro's children, even a proposal of marriage from an eligible doctor. In a poignant conclusion, Tita manages to break the bonds of tradition, if not for herself, then for future generations.