Michelle S. (chelly10s) - Reviews

1 to 4 of 4
Anna Karenina
Anna Karenina
Author: Leo Tolstoy
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 2
Review Date: 3/16/2011
Helpful Score: 1


This is one of the best books I've ever read. Tolstoy was a genius. It's absolutely amazing how he was able to write from the point of view of so many different characters--including a dog at one point!

His characters are concerned with a lot of problems in society that still seem relevant today. They grapple with how to right them or overcome them, which makes for very thought provoking reading. He also seems to thoroughly understand passion, familial love, integrity, shame, and many complicated human emotions that make the characters in this book some of the most relatable of any book I've read.

It takes a long time to read, but don't be discouraged. The journey is well worth it.


The Bell Jar (Perennial Classics)
The Bell Jar (Perennial Classics)
Author: Sylvia Plath
Book Type: Hardcover
  • Currently 3.7/5 Stars.
 76
Review Date: 4/1/2010
Helpful Score: 1


Beautifully well-written with a satisfyingly unique voice, this book is a MUST read. Plath led an interesting life and I thought the bit of biographical information in my copy improved my understanding and appreciation of this book, her only novel.


Blindness
Blindness
Author: Jose Saramago, Giovanni Pontiero (Translator)
Book Type: Paperback
  • Currently 3.7/5 Stars.
 237
Review Date: 4/21/2010
Helpful Score: 1


I think it was accurately described as "Lord of the Flies with blind people". Although, some of the "breakdowns" of civilization are a little far fetched in my opinion, and some likely problems were ignored.

As for the style, the lack of punctuation only increased my respect for Saramago's writing because each sentence (or clause) was crafted so that if you pay attention, it is always clear who was speaking and to whom. This only became vague where it was intentional and benefited the story.

I would absolutely recommend this book to others. Just note that the book does slow down after the exciting beginning, but don't allow yourself to become uninterested. It is worth reading through, not because there is a climatic ending, but because the story can only be properly evaluated as a whole.


The Geography of Bliss: One Grump's Search for the Happiest Places in the World
Review Date: 10/8/2010
Helpful Score: 1


This book was a fun read. I couldn't wait to read where the author was going next and what he was learning from the people and the environment. He travels all over the world, making interesting observations about the communities. While happiness is a very subjective thing to measure, his descriptions give you a strong sense of how happy or unhappy the people he encounters truly are--regardless of how happy they describe themselves to be.


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